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Rice


Introduction | Varieties | Soil Requirement | Seed Sowing
Nutrient management | Water management | Weed management | Insect pests and Diseases management
harvesting and post harvest management | Miscellaneous

Manuring


Nutriens* (kg/ha) Fertilizers (kg/ha) Muriate of Potash
  N P2O5 K2O Urea SSP MOP Urea SSP MOP
High Yielding Varieties 90 40 40 195 250 65 16 20 5
Local Varieties 50 25 25 108 156 42 9 12 3


Apply whole of phosphorus and potash and half nitrogen prior to last puddling operation but not more than 1-3 days before transplanting. Incorporate the fertilizers well in the top 10 cm of puddled soil. Apply the remaining nitrogen in two splits - one 3 weeks after transplanting and the other 4-5 weeks later at panicle initiation stage. About 5-10 tonnes of well rotten FYM or compost per hectare should be incorporated before puddling. In case of sub-optimal dose of N, a single top dressing at the time of active tillering or panicle initiation would be more beneficial as compared to applying it at transplanting or in multiple splits.

When the soil are continuously submerged for whole of the year and only paddy crop is taken, nitrogen and phosphorus may be applied at the rate of 60 kg and 40 kg/ha respectively.

Application of P2O5 and K2O may be avoided if these nutrient were applied to preceeding rabu crops. It the whole quantity of nitrogen is not available as urea or ammonium sulphate, CAN may be used for the split application. But there may be considerable loss of nitrogen when applied through CAN.


Zinc deficiency

Generally, zinc deficiency is mot wide spread micro-nutrient disorder in paddy crop. The incidence of this deficiency is frequent where top soil has been removed or soils have high pH, high CaCO3 content and high organic matter content. The characteristic symptoms of zinc deficiency in paddy is bloaching of the mid rib of leaves. The symptoms are most marked on the 3rd or 4th basal leaf after 3-4 weeks of transplanting. While the mid ribs becomes yellowish particularly at the base of the leaf, the leaf tip remains normal green.

Besides this, light yellowish spots appear on the leaves, which later enlarge and coalesce and turn deep brown. The entire leaves becomes brown in colour and dries out with the advancement in age. Infact, irrespective of the age of the plant, if the mid rib is lighter colour than lamina, zinc deficiency is suspected. Zinc deficiency can be corrected by application of zinc sulphate @ 25 kg/ha. Soil and plant analysis need to be done for the confirmation of its deficiency and deciding its dose. In transplanted paddy, mid zinc deficiency has also been corrected by dipping seedlings in 1-4% zinc oxide solution prior to transplanting. Zinc sulphate should be applied atleast 2 days after the application of P fertilizer. If the deficiency symptoms appear in the leaves, 0.5 per cent zinc sulphate solution (5 kg zinc sulphate mixed with 2.5 kg calcium hydroxide per ha) could be sprayed.

Package of Practice


Introduction | Varieties | Soil Requirement | Seed Sowing
Nutrient management | Water management | Weed management | Insect pests and Diseases management
harvesting and post harvest management | Miscellaneous
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